Edmonton Dream City for Walking

Posted by Ryan Dutka . on Tuesday, May 7th, 2019 at 12:36pm.

 

1) Edmonton is a walker’s dream city.
Edmonton is planning an Urban Balcony - Armature project
to have a walkway in the shape of a large U to extend over the river valley
to allow people to walk out and see the valley from a high suspended point
as they did at the Hoover Dam

Edmonton’s river valley is home to the longest stretch of connected urban parkland
anywhere in North America. There are over ninety-seven kilometres (61 miles)
of biking, hiking, skiing, walking and snow-shoeing trails.

Edmonton has Canada's highest area of parkland per resident
Edmonton's "Ribbon of Green" is reinforced by neighbourhood parks
throughout the city yielding 27,400 acres of parkland.

communities on foot map series
http://www.edmonton.ca/transportation/MapSeries2013.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

2) ART & DESIGN IN PUBLIC PLACES WALKING TOUR
Diverse and publicly funded works of art enliven Edmonton’s downtown,
thanks to a multi-partner initiative directed
by The Works International Visual Arts Society.
Drop in at the Downtown Business Association, 10121 Jasper Ave. (780-424-4085)
and ask for the Guide to Downtown Edmonton,
which includes a description of the walking tour.
The Works website also contains a description and location of each work.
Go to www.theworks.ab.ca,
click on Art & Design in Public Places, then on Walking Tours.
Or go directly to www.theworks.ab.ca/placesfolder/tour/tour.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

3) GALLERY WALK
The Gallery Walk Association hosts “Gallery Walk” weekends
each spring, fall and winter,
but you create your own walk anytime, browsing other shops and spots as you go.
Details: www.gallery-walk.com Walking Tour Guide of the Centennial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  

 


     

4) LEGACY MURAL PROJECT
Old Strathcona Business Association, #401, 10324 - 82 Ave.
(open Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) 
and on the association’s website, (780) 437-4182, 
www.oldstrathcona.ca

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

5) HERITAGE WALKS
Alberta Legislature Health Walk Loop
Enjoy a rain-or-shine walk through the Alberta Legislature pedway system.
Start at the Alberta Legislative Assembly Interpretative Centre,
where you can pick up a brochure or find the first of the signs which will direct your way.
Ten exercise stations designed by the Grant MacEwan College Centre
for Sport and Wellness invite you to combine aerobic conditioning
with strength and endurance training.
The 57 acres of parkland surrounding Alberta’s domed seat of government
also make for an excellent walk which can be linked
to the Ribbon of Steel trail running north from the High Level Bridge.

You can also book a free guided tour of the legislature
which will entail some marble stair climbing.

Brochures available at Interpretative Centre,
Pedway Mall, 10820 98 Ave. Book a free tour
or request a brochure by mail at (780) 427-7362, [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

6) CEMETERIES

A Municipal Cemeteries Ancestral Heritage
Project is encouraging greater use of our cemeteries.
So don’t be afraid to walk, run, ski, cycle and rollerblade in these public resting places.
Details: Find addresses of municipal cemeteries at www.edmonton.ca
by following this path: People Services & Programs > People Services > Cemeteries >
Cemetery. Or at (780) 496-6983, email [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

HERITAGE WALKS

7) FORT EDMONTON PARK & JOHN JANZEN NATURE CENTRE
Fort Edmonton includes a re-creation of the fur-trading post
after which we’re named as well as streets recalling Edmonton
in 1885, 1905 and 1920. John Janzen Nature Centre offers ways
to extend your wander along riverside trails, with or without a guide.
Located at Whitemud Drive (Southwest end of Quesnell Bridge)
and Fox Drive. Hours change seasonally. Fort: (780) 496-8787;
Nature Centre: (780) 496-8787; [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




8) HISTORICAL WALKING TOURS OF DOWNTOWN EDMONTON
Tour brochures available at City Hall, #1 Sir Winston Churchill Sq.;
the Downtown Business Association, 10121 Jasper Ave.; Edmonton Tourism,
9990 Jasper Ave., Planning and Development, 6th Fl 10250 101 St.







 

 






 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

9) HERITAGE TRAIL
Follow the red brick trail past Edmonton’s first schoolhouse, 
grand public buildings and fine private homes. 
Stop along McDougall Drive at the outdoor “interpretative gallery” 
for a beautiful view of the river valley and a self-guided tour through 
more of Edmonton’s past.
Start at 110 Street and 99 Avenue 
and go east along the red brick trail to 97 Street.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 


    


10) HIGHLANDS HISTORICAL WALKING TOUR 
For an even longer stroll, drop down to a riverside trail 
running between Concordia College (7128 Ada Blvd ) 
and the 50th Street pedestrian bridge.
Purchase informative self-guiding brochures ($2)
at Mandolin Books & Coffee Company, 6419 112 Ave., (780) 479-4050. 
Watch for guided tours during such times as Historic Edmonton Week.
124 Street: The Original West End

Walk through Edmonton’s historic Groat Estates and West Oliver
following a map with intriguing insights about buildings and streets along the way.
Approximate walking time one hour.
Brochure available at 124 Street & Area Business Association, 201 10706 124 St.,
(780) 413-6503, www.124StBRZ.com. Also stocked by some area stores.

 

 

 

 



 



 11) STRATHCONA HISTORICAL WALKING TOURS
Learn the history of key buildings in this bustling south side district 
while enjoying the ambience of Edmonton’s most well preserved historic area. 
Antique and gift shops, coffee spots, cafes, bookstores and more make good use
of buildings that predate Strathcona’s 1912 amalgamation
with the City of Edmonton. Brochures: Old Strathcona Foundation Office,
#401, 10324 82 Ave. open Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(780) 437-4182, www.oldstrathcona.ca.




 

 


    

12) DOWNTOWN PEDWAY WALKS
Find your way using a map of downtown pedways and elevated crossings
published by the Downtown Business Association. 
Whether you live, work or only occasionally
visit downtown, it’s another way to walk the urban landscape.

Pick up a pedway map at the Downtown Business Association (10121 Jasper Ave.) 
or at any hotel and office with a security desk. Or download from the DBA website. 
The DBA also is a convenient spot to pick up other walker resources, including ETS
schedules and Cycle Edmonton maps. (780) 424-4085, email
[email protected], www.edmontondowntown.com
www.edmontondowntown.com/live/media/ dwntwnmap.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


13) KINSMEN SPORTS CENTRE TRAILS & MAPS

Distances range from the
3-K “River Stroll”
to the 24-K “Are You Kidding?”
Runner’s World names the following among the most popular, scenic,
and easy to navigate routes:

• Cloverdale Clover, a 7.3-km serpentine
which takes the north bank trail, then crosses Cloverdale Bridge and back.

• Rambo, a rugged 12.5-km loop around the University of Alberta
and the William Hawrelak Peninsula.

• The Lovely MacKinnon, a 12-km run over a bridge,
to the top of beautiful MacKinnon Ravine and back.
• Pigs Only, 16 km for mud-craving oinkers.

• The Mill Creek Monster, 16.7 green kilometres
through Queen Elizabeth Park and Mill Creek Ravine to Argyll Park and back.

• Visit the Zoo, a long S-shaped, 20-km all-riverside loop
which passes the city’s animal park.

Maps: Kinsmen Sports Centre, 9100 Walterdale Hill, (780) 433-5901,
[email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

14) MUTTART CONSERVATORY
Edmonton’s premier horticultural attraction, nestled in the river valley 
at 9626 96A St., features more than 700 species of plants in arid, 
temperate and tropical climates.
(780) 496-8755, email [email protected], www.edmonton.ca/muttart









 

 

 

 

 

 


 

15) OFF-LEASH PARK SITES
Area maps showing boundaries are posted at each site. 
Bring your pooper scooper — and have your leash ready for use.
Details: Find off-leash sites at www.edmonton.ca by following this path: Home > Parks
& River Valley > Parks > Off-leash Park Sites.
Or contact the off-leash areas co-ordinator at
(780) 496-1475. To volunteer for off-leash park patrol or report hazards, 
contact park rangers at (780) 496-2950, email: [email protected]



 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 16) SASKATCHEWAN DRIVE
Running parallel to Whyte Avenue along the top river valley, 
the walkway along Saskatchewan Drive offers excellent views, 
benches and lookout points. Take an evening stroll for an impressive panorama 
featuring the downtown skyline. 
Several paths lead down from here to river valley trails.

 

 

 

 

 

 



       

17) SHOPPING MALL WALKS
Londonderry Mall:
boasts Edmonton’s largest mall walking program, 
with 1000 registered members. The walking season runs September to April, 
with walkers out 7 to 10 a.m. weekdays. Members also party together and receive
discounts at participating stores. To find out more, contact Haley Fostvelt, marketing
coordinator, [email protected]


West Edmonton Mall:
invites walkers to walk at their own pace and time along all or part of a 6-kilometre
“course.” Level One of the mall is equivalent to 3.3 km;
Level Two is equivalent to 2.8 km. The mall is always open,
but the best walking time is 7 to 10 a.m. Walker maps are available at the mall’s
Guest Services Centre, Visitor Information Centre and Mall administration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

18) VALLEY ZOO
Next door to Laurier Park in Edmonton’s river valley, the Valley Zoo 
at 13315 Buena Vista Road (87 Ave.) features creatures around every corner. 
Launched in 1959 as a themed “storyland” park, the zoo increasingly supports education
and conservation. Here your wander will lead to wonder at the variety in our world.
(780) 496-8787, email [email protected], www.edmonton.ca/valleyzoo



 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

19) NORDIC POLES
The sport’s popularity is due in part to the health benefits involved, 
which can be 30 per cent greater than the benefits of normal walking. 
Using poles improves your posture and, by propelling your body forward 
and thus increasing the length of your stride, helps you walk faster. 
Because the use of poles reduces the load on the knees and other joints, 
it can actually be easier on the body than walking without poles. 
Think you’ll look goofy walking along with what looks like ski poles, sans snow? 
Not for long, experts predict. Be at the front of the wave!


TO ALL WISDOMS

If there is no dull and determined effort,
there will be no brilliant achievemt.
Hsun-tzu

Until next time
Nef
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1 Response to "Edmonton Dream City for Walking"

Jean Leduc wrote: Very nice article !
Walking really is the best way to know the soul of a city.

Posted on Sunday, July 14th, 2013 at 9:56am.

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